Should pedestrians be penalised for using smartphones at crossings?

Taiwan legislators are trying to pass a bill which will fine pedestrians who use their smartphones while crossing the road. Is that good?

taiwan

Don’t text and drive. According to a campaign based in the US, “individuals who drive while sending or reading text messages are 23 per cent more likely to be involved in a car crash than other drivers”.

But what about individuals who cross the road while sending or reading text messages? A report in Forbes published yesterday about a group of lawmakers in Taiwan made us look up from our smartphones and into the message of ‘don’t text and walk’. Contributor Ralph Jennings added that the law will not work in the country.

The Taiwanese legislators are trying to pass a bill, which will fine pedestrians who use smartphones while crossing the street a NT$300 (US$9.93). Chiu Chih-wei, the legislature’s chief backer, said that the pending law will serve as a warning to the public.

Having passed one out of three steps towards finalisation, the bill will eventually see an “enforcement plan” being put in place, which may involve “mounted cameras”, said Chiu, who was cited in the same Forbes report.

Also Read: Big Data analytics service QSearch wins Echelon Taiwan Satellite 2014

Chiu voiced out that drivers will still have to bear responsibility. However, with the law being implemented, people will be more mindful of their personal safety, especially while crossing the road.

Are we that addicted to technology that we cannot bear to look away from our devices for a few minutes? This author believes that the law should be implemented, since it can help to deter more road accidents.

Image Credit: YouTube

Elaine Huang

Elaine is a fervent believer that if there ever is a zombie apocalypse, we will all be snapping away at them with our phones and posting them onto Instagram. A Mass Communication graduate of Ngee Ann Polytechnic's School of Film and Media Studies, she enjoys writing about technology and entrepreneurs. When not hashtagging her way through all sorts of trouble, Elaine is probably contemplating how to write in the third person.

Related posts

Top