Internet service provider MyRepublic takes on SMEs, looks at expanding

Attention SMEs: Singapore-based fibre broadband provider is saying that it can propel your business into space.

MyRepublic

While most Singaporeans might know the three big telcos in Singapore — SingTel, StarHub and M1 — most might be unaware that there is a fourth Internet service provider (ISP), MyRepublic.

Launched last year in February, the bold fibre broadband service provider today announced that it is looking to tackle the small and medium enterprise (SME) market. The Singapore-based company also shared that they are looking at entering countries like New Zealand, Australia and Malaysia.

SMEs: from small to mighty?

MyRepublic noted that there were over 220,000 SMEs housed in over 23,000 commercial buildings in the city-state. Its CEO Malcolm Rodriguez added that while 800 of those buildings are covered by StarHub, almost everyone else is covered by SingTel copper.

In terms of fibre broadband, the SME market is also relatively unserved. About less than 20 percent of these businesses are running on networks which offer better speeds and more support.

Arnaud Boissonnet, MyRepublic’s head of enterprise, said that they are looking to reproduce the success they’ve had with their consumer space in the SME market. In less than 2 years, the firm has garnered over 400,000 12,500 subscribers.

Malcolm added that SMEs is the unserved market in that less than 20 percent of these businesses are running on fibre broadband.

Chief commercial officer KC Lai  later told e27 that they have seen about 300 companies join them organically. He shared that these companies come from quite diverse backgrounds, ranging from advertising to logistics and manufacturing.

The company also shared that 22 percent of sales can be attributed to their MyRepublic Partner Program, which allows customers to refer their friends and family to the network.

Read also: Quick fire ways to optimize your Facebook page to sell more online

With over 53 staffers, MyRepublic sees over 12,000 invoices sent out every month. Confidently, KC opined that the incumbents have been aping their younger and faster counterpart. He added, “I hear some of the big guys are a bit fearful of us. We’re giving them a run for their money. What is the moral of this story? If we can do it, all the SMEs out there in Singapore market can do the same thing.”

“Our objective is only one thing and it’s very clear. It’s to make the small mighty,” said KC as he explained how MyRepublic knows SMEs best since it used to be a small company as well. They first started in one of the founders’s kitchen and came up with a blueprint for the company. And as they say, the rest is history.

smes_MyRepublic

Products for the SME market

For those in the SME space, MyRepublic is offering three plans to counter the needs mentioned in the pyramid of needs. For small offices, the simplest plan “Business” comes at S$186 every month (US$146) and offers up to 100 Mbps download speed, 100 Mbps upload speed, 99.95 Uptime SLA, 24/7 technical support, enterprise-grade router and a static IP option at S$50 every month.

UPDATE: The other two are priced at SG$499 (US$391), and SG$999 (US$783) per month. This does not include the seven percent goods and services tax products are required to charge.

Read also: The ultimate guide to e-commerce statistics of Malaysia and SEA

MyRepublic2

One of their features available in their business solutions helps to reduce “cyber-slacking” and improve workplace productivity. Partnering up with Mako Network, MyRepublic will introduce a content filtering system to control what websites employees are able or forbidden to visit during work hours.

Featured Image Credit: Shutterstock

Elaine Huang

Elaine is a fervent believer that if there ever is a zombie apocalypse, we will all be snapping away at them with our phones and posting them onto Instagram. A Mass Communication graduate of Ngee Ann Polytechnic's School of Film and Media Studies, she enjoys writing about technology and entrepreneurs. When not hashtagging her way through all sorts of trouble, Elaine is probably contemplating how to write in the third person.

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